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Posted on May 8, 2013 in Essentials | 0 comments

Cotija Cheese

Cotija Cheese

Cotija Cheese Cotija cheese (in Spanish, queso añejado, meaning “aged cheese”) is a hard, crumbly Mexican cheese made primarily from cow’s milk. Named after the town of Cotija in the Mexican state of Michoacán, Cotija (pronounced ko-TEE-hah) is used as an all-purpose grating or crumbling cheese. White, salty, and somewhat granular, Cotija cheese softens but does not actually melt when heated. When fresh, Cotija cheese bears a resemblance in flavor and texture to feta cheese. Aged, Cotija grates smoothly and has more in common with Parmigiano-Reggiano. This similarity in form and function has earned it the nickname “Mexican Parmesan.” Traditional, artisanally crafted Mexican Cotija cheese is made with raw milk and aged for a period of three to twelve months. Commercially made varieties accelerate the curing period to produce a finished cheese in weeks, versus months. This is often achieved by the addition of an enzyme, which gives the commercially produced version a subtly different flavor from the artisanal variety. With at least twice the salt content of most Cheddar...

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Posted on Apr 24, 2013 in Essentials | 0 comments

Comal [ko-MAHL]

Comal [ko-MAHL]

The comal is an essential and versatile griddle that I use daily to heat tortillas but I also use it to roast poblanos, blacken tomatillos, and other chiles and peppers.

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